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Can Social Media Contribute to a Jesus Revolution?

Viva la RevolutionJeff Gibson is an extremely intelligent guy who advises heads of state and leaders of corporation about messaging, marketing, and many other things I’ll never fully understand. Chris Forbes has been a leader in missions for as long as I’ve been a Pastor and was actually the very first person I ever followed on Twitter. The two of them and I participated in a little discussion with our friend, Jon Walker about the role of social media in a cultural revolution.

The post is live on Pastors.com.

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Politics Won’t Save the World

On my Facebook profile, when asked to state my political views, I simply put, “If I thought politics could save the world, I wouldn’t be a Pastor.” I’m just not that into it.

Plenty of people will read this and assume I don’t care. It’s not that I don’t care, I care deeply. I vote. I sometimes contact people in Washington about an issue (though it’s rare). But I don’t have much hope that government can really save society. Why? Well in a discussion with a friend by email, I replied with these lines…

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Nineteen Reasons Baptists Should Stop Voting on Stuff

I’m not seriously calling for the abolition of voting among churches, just a severe reduction in the practice. I’m a strong believer in the autonomy of the local church, but I’m the first to admit, I don’t like church “business.”

I was once the Pastor of a church in central Arkansas that had battled years of political scheming and the resulting resentment. We once moved an old metal desk out of the auditorium into a side room and I got in huge trouble because the moving of the desk wasn’t voted on! On the basis of this and dozens of other frustrating experiences, here are some reasons I think we should vote not to vote on so much stuff…


By the way, have you "liked" Grace Hills Church on Facebook yet?


  1. Voting never brings unity, it actually calls for division. Who is for and who is against?
  2. Voting is democratic – government by the people. Church should be theocratic – government by the Holy Spirit.
  3. Voting plays right to the flesh and personal preferences. We typically vote what we want or prefer, regardless of what God wants or what leaders are leading us to do.
  4. Voting gives equal weight to every member, regardless of investment in ministry.
  5. Voting leads us to believe that the majority must be right. According to some presidential elections, that obviously isn’t true (I’ll leave you to sort out which ones make my case).
  6. Voting gives the impression that a plurality of approval is the same as unity. It’s not. One deeply hurt family prevents real “unity.”
  7. Voting supersedes God’s intended order of leadership within the structure of the local church.
  8. Voting risks friendships needlessly.
  9. Voting equals leadership by polls. Since when did Jesus ever ask the audience their opinion? Even with His shepherd’s heart, Jesus never polled the sheep to find out which direction to go.
  10. Voting doesn’t work too well for Congress!
  11. Voting is man-made, there isn’t a single scriptural example. And Mattathias is not an example (Acts 1).
  12. Voting keeps us business-minded, not ministry-minded.
  13. Voting suggests the church has a political side. It’s the only time we really see power plays within God’s family.
  14. Voting is governed by rules but church is governed by relationships.
  15. Voting creates confusion and invites the opinions of 15, or 150, or 1500 viewpoints. No real problems are ever solved.
  16. Hanging chads.
  17. Democrats.
  18. Republicans.
  19. People were pretty much unanimous to crucify Jesus.

You’ve got to admit, I have at least a dozen good points, right? What’s your vote?

Why I’m Moved by the Inauguration of President Barack Obama

I’ll be brief. I’m moved…

  • I’m moved by Rick Warren’s prayer. It was nice to hear him pray the entire model prayer and to call for civility when differing, which indeed allows for differing.
  • I’m moved by the election of America’s first African-American president. That’s significant.
  • I’m moved by what his election says about the sanctity of life. What? Well, just watch this.
  • I’m moved by the respect Bush paid to Obama, and likewise.
  • I’m moved by a nation showing up in the millions to welcome their new leader.
  • I’m moved by the election of a man who cares about many of the things I care about.

I’m also concerned…

  • I’m concerned about the sanctity of life (this is the most pro-abortion President in our history).
  • I’m concerned about the growing power of government.
  • I’m concerned about taking a softer approach with militant Muslim nations.
  • I’m concerned about our security.

I’m also positive. I believe in giving the benefit of the doubt. Barack Obama begins today with a clean slate. We shall see what unfolds. President Bush was a different man with different viewpoints just a few years into his first term. Some of those changes were positive, some negative. God can change the heart of Obama as well – he seems tender enough.

I’m also prayerful. I’m commanded to pray for my new President and have a heart to do so. Here’s what I’m praying for…

  • His safety.
  • His family’s unity (he sets a great example here).
  • His life to be in balance.
  • His cabinet to be genuinely helpful.
  • His heart to change on abortion and other moral issues.
  • His courage in the face of world threats.
  • His legacy to be as positive as it is so far when he leaves office in four or eight years.

Hail to the Chief, but Praise to King Jesus – my supreme and sovereign Lord. What’s your delight/concern/prayer for your new President today?

Rick Warren Will Pray the Invocation at Barack Obama’s Inauguration

Wow, the media has really enjoyed this particular debacle. The gay rights movement is up in arms over Barack Obama’s choice of Rick Warren to pray the invocation at his inauguration in January. This results primarily from Rick’s endorsement of Proposition 8, which is essentially a protection of the definition of marriage as between one man and one woman for the state of California.

I don’t envy Rick for being thrown into such a firestorm. He’s been been accused of spreading hate and of being a homophobe. I see it as kind of a defining moment in American culture over the issues of homosexuality and tolerance. If any American Pastor has made an attempt to nurture fair and balanced discussion on social and political issues, it’s Rick Warren. Call him what you will, he desires to dialog with people on both sides of the aisle. He released this statement regarding the whole affair:

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