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The Basics of Blogging and Online Publishing

BloggingBlogging is such a weird word. We never used it until people started keeping “logs” on the “web” of their life called “weblog” and for some reason, we dropped the “we” and were left with the art of blogging. And in a sense, it has changed everything. How? Because now, everyone is a publisher.

Every business, every church, and every institution is now a publisher, and those who publish with the most gusto win. It’s the age where people with few connections and little resources can grow their voice in the marketplace in inexpensive and creative ways.

I’m writing this post for those who haven’t jumped in yet. I’d love to dialog about the latest developer’s beta version of WordPress or Google’s search algorithm, but my goal is instead to reach out to those who are on the verge of blogging and push you over the edge to take the dive. If you need to read no more, head over to WordPress or Tumblr and get started! If you’re still looking to rationalize your decision, read on…

Why Blog?

Still with me? Let me give you some reasons to jump in.

  1. Everybody is doing it. This is normally a stupid reason to do anything, but in this case, what I mean is that everybody is talking and conversing about everything, and your voice matters.
  2. It’s easy. There was a time when you needed to know html or write the code for your own blogging platform. Now, with a few clicks you can sign up and from your smartphone, you can blog.
  3. It’s cheap. In fact, it’s usually free, or costs peanuts, to get started.
  4. You can earn some income. Don’t plan on getting rich off of blogging. It’s been done before and will be done again, but don’t assume you’re going to be the next John Chow, who makes money online by telling people how to make money online. Most of the “six-figure bloggers” were in the game early, but you can still earn a bit of an income if you’re patient and consistent.
  5. You can expand your influence. Ideas change the world, and today, ideas are shaped by the conversation online.

In other words, this isn’t just for geeks and nerds anymore. It’s for you too (assuming you don’t fall into either of those categories).

What To Do

Convinced? With me? Good. Now what in the world are you going to blog about? What does “blogging” look like for you? You can make blogging a time of personal journaling, but I want to challenge you to think a little harder than that. Let’s re-define blogging as putting your passion into words for the world to experience.

Your passion.

If you are passionate about underwater basket-weaving, blog about it. If it’s vintage and retro living, go for it. If you’re all about the latest flip-flops coming out of the fashion scene, blog about it. The blogs I read are those written by people who are passionate, whose passion spills out in a contagious way.

In words.

Blogging can include video and other forms of media, and will more and more as time goes on. What I’m getting at is that blogging is the act of allowing your passion to escape your heart and find expression online in a form others can consume.

For the world to experience.

I talk a lot about the experience of reading blogs because I’m a design and communications nut. For me, content is highly important, but so is its aesthetic surroundings. I’m not drawn to mere words. I’m drawn to the experience of reading them in their creative context.

Blog On Topic

So blog about what you know, what you love, and what you can speak authoritatively about to the world. Stay focused. I blog about an array of subjects, but they are mostly related to each other. If I started blogging entirely about weedrat recipes, I’d lose my readers, no matter how good weedrat stew might be.

Network With Others

Writing is good, but reading is better. Speaking is great, but listening is even greater. Blogging isn’t simply the dissemination of information. Rather it’s the joining of an ongoing, developing conversation about a niche. The more people you help, connect with, and pour into, the more you and your blogging influence will ultimately benefit.

Read Great Blogs on Blogging

Don’t read them all – you’ll go nuts. There are too many of them. But some of my own favorites are:

  • WeBlogBetter.com (I started this one, but Kiesha Easley has taken it beyond my wildest dreams).
  • ProBlogger (A lot about earning money, but a lot about powerful networking too).
  • Copyblogger (A whole lot of longer posts about writing, communication, and marketing).
  • Fuel Your Blogging (I used to be the Editor, but Christopher is much better!).
  • Kikolani (She gathers together some of the best resources on the web).
  • Social Media Examiner (Not all about blogging, but the broader topic of social media, of which blogging is one part).
  • Chris Brogan (An expert who blogs his expertise rather freely).
  • Danny Brown (Few understand blogging activism like Danny).
  • Michael Hyatt (He understands blogging from the perspective of a respected publishing executive).
  • For Bloggers By Bloggers (A steady stream of great tips).
  • Blogussion (Another great site with great tips).
  • Hubspot offers another list of great blogs too.

Jump In!

Here’s my step-by-step guide to getting started with blogging in a half an hour or less. Understand that if you can get hosting, a domain, and a custom-designed WordPress theme, you’ll be better off in the long run. But this isn’t the long run. This is the moment of taking the plunge. So here’s my challenge:

  1. Sign up for an account at WordPress.com.
  2. Pick a nice theme that reflects the personality of your blog. You can change later, and even move your WordPress.com blog to a self-hosted platform. For now, pick something pretty.
  3. Create an “About” page where you tell the world whom you are and other ways to connect with you (link to your Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and other social profiles).
  4. Write a blog post. No, “This is your first blog post.” doesn’t count. Craft a catchy, attention-getting title and briefly pour your heart out.
  5. Post the hyperlink on Twitter, Facebook, and wherever else you hang out online. Don’t be shy. Do it!

Oh, and below, in the comments, tell me where you blog! What would you add to what I’ve said (for the soon-to-be newbie bloggers)?

Image credit: Kristina B

Thinking Beyond Blogging: The Future Of Digital Publishing

Will blogging continue to exist? Absolutely. And that is a great thing. I love great bloggers such as Tim Ferriss, Jonathan Fields, and Chris Guillebeau (although I would argue they are all digital publishers as they combine video, text, and more…but that is a whole other topic). But, the way I see it is sort of like blogging is the father. And now there are all kinds of kids growing into their own with their own personalities, etiquette, experiences, and more with their own vision of digital publishing.

Blogging is growing up, just as predicted… by me at least.

Read the Full Article

The Three Rules of Content Marketing (via @junta42)

1. You Are a Publisher

Simply defined, a publisher delivers on the informational or entertainment needs of the reader in whatever format in which the reader wants to engage.  A traditional publisher does this to generate sponsorship revenues or get people to pay for content. The non-media brand does this to ultimately sell more products and services. More and more companies, like ours, do both.

Publishing is hard work, but also mandatory for today’s companies.  Believing that you are a publisher is the first rule.

2. Dream it, Do it! 

Innovation is a new way of doing something, or new stuff made useful. As publishers, we innovate to solve our customers’ pain points. Every day, every minute. The innovation happens not because of the content, but the affect it has on the reader. That’s true innovation.

3. It’s Not About You

Successful publishing is all about the reader…your customers. If you are not solving their pain points with relevant and compelling content, you are adding to the noise, the clutter.

Read the full article at blog.junta42.com

These three rules are absolutely true, but you need to read the full article.

You Couldn’t Pay Me to Subscribe to Your Newspaper

I actually felt a tiny bit of sympathy as the newspaper subscription salesman walked back down my driveway after I’d just turned him down for a subscription. I felt bad for three reasons:

  1. He made a good offer. The paper was cheap and the coupons inside would more than pay for it on any given week.
  2. He probably faced this a lot. I wasn’t the only door he knocked on that day.
  3. The future isn’t so bright right now for newspaper subscription salespeople.

Did you catch that the paper would have paid for itself? The coupons alone would have actually repaid my subscription fee and then some, but I turned it down. Why would I be so foolish? Just as I told the kind gentleman, newspapers have a funny way of collecting in a pile at the end of my driveway. Then it rains and they’re heavier when I pick them up and put them in the recycle bin.

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