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8 Simple Ways to Pour Into Leaders

Windshield TimeIn the American church, we tend to think of leadership development as a classroom and curriculum-based process, but Jesus had a better idea: spend time with people. Jesus allowed His life to rub off on His chosen leaders and to pour His wisdom into them, and we can do the same. Sometimes it’s a matter of spotting the natural opportunities that come along while at other times, its an intentionally-planned conversation.

Here are some simple ways to make leadership development a part of your life…

  1. Schedule three to five informal meetings per week – coffee, lunch, etc. – with people into whom you want to invest.
  2. Take potential leaders on trips with you. I’ve heard great leaders talk about the mentoring power of never traveling alone. My Worship Pastor calls it “windshield time.”
  3. If you’re a Pastor, take a partner as you do pastoral care – hospital visits, etc. Just the time in the car on the way is a great opportunity.
  4. Buy and send books to leaders. I’ve received and given books that have shaped who I am.
  5. Check in with a phone call. Have a list of potential leaders into whom you’re pouring, and randomly call them once a month or so.
  6. Convene conversations. Gather leaders who aspire to be involved in the things you’ve spent your life doing and let them connect with each other.
  7. Listen. Pouring into leaders doesn’t mean doing all the talking. It often means lending an ear in a tough moment.
  8. Connect leaders to other leaders. It’s powerful when we say, “here’s a friend of mine you need to connect with.”

I can’t begin to thank God enough for the leaders He has placed in my life as mentors, friends, and coaches. I’m sometimes blown away by the graciousness of those who will pour into me.

We recently ran an article on Pastors.com by Pastor Rick Warren on how every Pastor needs a mentor. I was surprised at the feedback when Pastors said they had a hard time finding someone who would make time available to another leader. Never get caught up in getting your own business done that you fail to pour into other leaders. It’s the Jesus way, the apostolic communion, and the future hope of the church.

What are you doing to pour into other leaders?


By the way, have you "liked" Grace Hills Church on Facebook yet?


Mentor the Next Generation or Risk Irrelevance

Mentoring young people has been a consistent part of my business model since I started my company 14 years ago. It has guaranteed that my skills stay sharp, my slang stays current, my tweets fly across mobile phones, and that the market of tomorrow will know, like, and trust me. If nothing else, another way to look at the value of mentoring is that they will be caring for you when you are no longer willing or able to work. Heed my warning: Ignore the next generation at your own peril. If you mentor the next generation, you can ensure that you have a future market.

Read the full article at openforum.com

These ten tips were written for business leaders, but as I read the article, I could not help but feel they are extremely relevant to ministry leaders as well.

Chuck Swindoll on the Marks of a Mentor: Trust

The mentors we admire are like
the bosses we love to work for: they are not controlling people. They trust
you
when they’re not around. They give you
an assignment and they rely on you to follow through. They’re not peeking in
your window. They don’t squint through your keyhole. They’re not checking up on
you through a friend or putting spies on your tail. They trust you.

read the whole article at insightforliving.typepad.com